Fall Foraging Finds 4


The world is looking a little browner lately, but there are still plenty of plants that thrive after frost. Here are a few edibles that are just hitting their peak.

 

EASTERN BLACK WALNUT (JUGLANS NIGRA)

 

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More information on harvesting and processing black walnuts HERE via Hunter, Angler, Gardener, Cook

(In order for you to have the best quality content possible, I included links to other resources rather than attempt to tackle all the information myself.)

 

GROUND CHERRY (PHYSALIS SPP.)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eat ground cherries only when ripe and yellow (pictured below).
Place green berries in a window for a few days to ripen.

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

Ripe Ground Cherry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More information on ground cherries HERE via Foraging Texas

Ground cherries will ALWAYS have husks.

Be careful not to confuse them with the highly toxic horsenettle (solanum carolinense), which can sicken livestock, and potentially kill a human.
It also has yellow berries, but will have thorns and no papery husks.

Below is a picture of horse nettle for comparison.
Again, and I can’t stress this enough,
DO NOT EAT HORSENETTLE BERRIES PICTURED BELOW.

Highly toxic horsenettle ***DO NOT EAT***

***TOXIC HORSENETTLE. DO NOT EAT!!!***

 


CURLY DOCK (RUMEX CRISPUS)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My personal favorite of all greens, wild or tame.

More information on curly dock HERE via Eat the Invaders

 

GARLIC MUSTARD (ALLIARIA PETIOLATA)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And my least favorite green, but if you enjoy it, eat to your hearts content.
Garlic mustard is an extremely invasive plant.

More information on garlic mustard HERE via Eat the Weeds

 

ROSE HIPS (ROSA SPP.)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All rose hips are edible.
Another invasive, the multiflora rose (pictured) bears loads of tasty and medicinal rose hips.
Be sure to take some thick gloves!

More information on the medicinal use of rose hips HERE via Hawthorn Hill Herbs

 

STINGING NETTLE (URTICA DIOICA)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep those gloves on!

HERE is a recipe for stinging nettle pesto via Splendid Table

 

COMMON MALLOW (MALVA NEGLECTA)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edible and medicinal

More information on mallow HERE via Edible Wild Food

 

CHICKWEED (STELLARIA MEDIA)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chickweed is completely edible and loves the cold weather. It is the first edible we find in the spring and the last of fall.

Click HERE for a recipe for Creamy Chickweed Dressing via The 3 Foragers

 

WILD GARLIC/ ONION (ALLIUM VINEALE)

{Kentucky Forager} Fall Wild Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A good rule of thumb for identification is smell. If it doesn’t have a strong onion smell, don’t eat it.

Wild garlic is extremely strong, but I think it’s great added to stir fry or sautéed veggies and greens.

 

**Remember, when foraging for wild edibles, never eat anything that you can’t positively identify. If you are foraging a plant you’ve never eaten before, only try a small amount and wait a day to be sure you have no allergic reactions.

You are responsible for your own safety!!! Please use caution!

Happy Foraging!

 

 


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4 thoughts on “Fall Foraging Finds

  • jason

    Awesome stuff you got here. Please keep writing these articles. You guys seem like such a wealth of information regarding some very interesting, tasty, and FREE food. Plus I’m keen on learning more on the medicinal uses of some of the native herbs. Keep up the good work.

    Thanks,
    Jason